A Sit Down With DJ David Tort

As a waypoint for eclectic musicians perform as they blow through town, maybe on an international tour, maybe at a house party for friends, Los Angeles has certainly seen more than its share of talented music shows. Hailing from Spain, music producer and DJ David Tort has been tearing up the charts the world over for years now

 

“To make whatever type of music I like and not have to do something that everyone else is doing.”

 

Could you let the readers know you as to how you began in House Music, and did you have musical experience before you began as a DJ or Producer?

I began as a dj in the year 1988 when I just finished school, then I was playing acid house, new beat, ebm, tehcno and finally i was into house music around 1998 I was playing with some old drum machines and synths in an Atari based system during the 90s but I released my first record in 2000. when I got my first Apple computer with logic…my life changed completely!

What were you doing in the early ’90s?

I was partying. I went to the club party when I was 14 years old and kept going. I first played acid house, which was big at the time, in 1988. From there I was investing.

What’s one of your most memorable live DJ sets/performances?

There are so many. But my Space Miami residency was very special to me. When I first played there, I was supposed to play a 2 hour set but they let me go for 4, the second time I had a 2 hour set again and I landed up playing for 7 – I just couldn’t stop and the crowd kept going. They gave me a residency for 6 years where I was doing 3-5 shows a year. We all became a family, with all the staff working there and the crowd too. I can now I can call it my Miami ‘home’.

Can you explain the similarities/contrast between Lost in Acid and Acid Rave Sex?

Yea its the same style as Acid, Rave, Sex. Earlier this year when I released it people really digged it as it was different than what’s out now and I’ve been wanting to do something similar but hadn’t gotten around to doing it. It only felt right to do it with this remix as the style is Acid House and the name of the track is called “Lost in Acid”! Plus David Tort is the king of Acid House and I’ve been doing a few Acid tracks this year so I knew he would dig.

Which do you prefer, performing live or working in the studio?

I can’t live without either! Although they are totally different worlds, they are intrinsically connected. It’s kind of like a singer who writes songs and then goes to perform them live: writing is a process, and playing is expression. I need to play shows to know what to do in the studio. How the crowd reacts and responds at a show will inform how I produce my next song. Playing live, expressing myself and having a connection with a crowd gives me the ultimate happiness I can experience – and I really mean that. And then the studio is my sanctuary. I clean it every Monday myself otherwise it does not flow. I’ll get a cup of coffee, take a walk around the neighborhood and then start making music smoothly and relaxed. Making a recording means creating something that will remain forever attached to your name. I don’t tend to work slowly, but I don’t like to rush either. Each piece of music is part of me, a segment in the story of my life.

That’s Really Cool — as for Luciano Ingrosso and Joia/Nero, how did they become aware of the song and what is it about Luciano and Joia/Nero that seperates them as a clear leader in House Music from other labels?

My music manager Cesar Lores (Blanco Y Negro) sent the track to Luciano, and he was totally in the track since the first time. i released my single “Lost In Acid” on Joia 2 years ago, and was one of the big steps that pushed my career to where i am right now, i know with Luciano we are in a good hands, he has a special ear for music, and we said straight “just go ahead with it!” — you can see today it’s number 4 on overall Beatport chart!

What’s one of your most memorable live DJ sets/performances?

There are so many. But my Space Miami residency was very special to me. When I first played there, I was supposed to play a 2 hour set but they let me go for 4, the second time I had a 2 hour set again and I landed up playing for 7 – I just couldn’t stop and the crowd kept going. They gave me a residency for 6 years where I was doing 3-5 shows a year. We all became a family, with all the staff working there and the crowd too. I can now I can call it my Miami ‘home’.

How do you see the state of electronic dance music?

I actually like where we’re going, besides the super comercial tracks topping the charts, I’ve seen the Beatport top 100 changing a lot this year. There’s a demand again for Club music and less cheesy melodic stuff just made for festivals to be played by DJ super stars. What happens with the average DJ working hard to bring food home and pay the rent? This makes space for other DJ’s like me and many others that are between the main two scenes – underground/mainstream to call it something. Why do we have to be black or white? I thought we were making music, so that’s where I think we’re going even if the two main waves will keep their way. The crowd and labels have their ears and heart open again. I think they’re tired of just jumping and putting their hands up in the air. It’s time to dance, it’s time for going to the club and forgetting about your problems and your fucking cell phone and just dancing. Close your eyes, hug the guy beside you that you don’t know at all. That’s what I’m talking about – go out with friends or just alone because you know the night is gonna end up well, and unleash yourself to dance and let the DJ express himself. Let him experiment with our feelings, let him take us on a trip, but for that we need the DJ to feel free, to feel he does not need to play a 45” drop and then 3 minutes breakdown, if we can make it there in 2016 then our culture is gonna be in a very good place, because it’s amazing music out there finally, really amazing.

You said house music is taking over the world. What do you think the international appeal of house music is?

I don’t know, man. I’m just happy where we are right now. I discovered house music in 1998 and before that I was into house type techno and stuff. A lot of different types of music.

So being an international DJ, what country do you think shows you the most love?

I make the same kind of set worldwide, but I have to say United States and maybe Brazil are places I feel more love from the crowd. They are really into it.

Questions? Comments? We want to know:@djfollower