A Sit Down With DJ Tujamo

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Tujamo is a German-born Producer and DJ, ranked on the #78 spot of the DJ Mag Top 100 DJs list. He is best known for his remixes of artists such as Bob Sinclar, Dubvision, Major Lazer, Laidback Luke, Deadmau5, Showtek, Martin Solveig and David Guetta, collaborations such as “Delirious” (with Steve Aoki & Chris Lake), “Cream” (with Danny Avila), as well as his tracks “Drop That Low”, “One On One”, and “Booty Bounce”.

 

 “I draw inspiration from all different genres and artists, and I always try to keep my finger on the pulse by being innovative, but true to my trademark style.”

 

You are a German-born producer and DJ, ranked on the #78 spot of the DJ Mag Top 100 DJs list. How did you get in touch with electronic dance music in the first place and how did you get into DJing and music production?

I started DJing as a hobby when I was in my early teens. Back then I’d always been massively influenced by artists like Laidback Luke, who made me excited about dance music. But it was my girlfriend that took the leap of faith for me when she entered me into a DJing competition. I was really reluctant at first, but in the end I went… and I ended up bagging first place! That was actually a really huge moment for me, it made me realise that I wanted to take DJing from a hobby and turn it into a professional venture, so I started honing my skills creatively and producing my own music.  

How did you decide to use the moniker “Tujamo”?
Well, back then I was creating the project with a friend. ‚Tujamo’ were both our names mixed together, so that it got a nice ring to it. We didn’t continue together but he was cool with me using the name.

How would you describe your sound to someone whose never heard you before?

You know, I’m not actually sure. It can be hard to try and describe something like this when you are so close to it. I just know that I spend a lot of studio time trying to make my music sound like Tujamo, and not like someone else. In music that can be one of the hardest aspects, but it’s something that you really need to try to do as a producer.

Favourite track you`ve made?

All of them mean something to me. I spend so much time making them.

Congratulations on your “One On One featuring Sorana” release. Can you tell us more about it?

Thank you! The track has been getting an amazing response, we put the video up on YouTube and it hit 1,000,000 views in 24 hours! About the record, I wanted to take my signature sound and push myself to create more of a song rather than just a club track. I really loved the process and I am planning to do this more in the future. There will be plenty of new music from me soon…

What do you think about the digitalising era of music? 
It helped the smaller DJs a lot I think but it also generated an impossible to work through load of music, without any chance to proof quality. I mean, I do support young producers but there should always be something like a quality control. Since that has completely fallen away in the last years, it’s sometimes super hard to find the real gems out there.

If you could work with any artist on a track, who would you choose and why?

I would want Michael Jackson to write something with me. Every time I hear his music it just overwhelms me how good it sounds, even his first albums. If I listen to my stuff from when I started, even with the technology involved and then think about how they made music back in the days, how tedious the process of recording and arranging was. I have the biggest respect for the music that was born back then and the quality it had, even 30-40 years later.

Is there a particular person you share your tracks with before you send out the finished product?

The first person that gets a new track or even rough snippets is my manager. I prefer to get real objective feedback. We work really closely together, so he knows exactly what’s good for me. I also like to send it to my friends, but nice as they are, they always tell me, “Damn, bro, it’s huuuuuuge!” As much as this flatters me, it’s not really helping me.

As a German DJ, do you find that there is any rivalry between German DJs and Dutch DJs?

No, we are neighbors so we are more like a team. We always support each other and it’s not a big competition, it’s more like team work.

What are you currently working and focusing on? What’s on your agenda for the near future?

I’ve just released a remix of David Guetta and Justin Bieber’s ‘2U’. I remember hearing the track on the radio when I was on the road between shows and it stuck with me, I loved the vocal! As soon as I got into the studio I put pen to paper and started reworking it. I love being in the studio and I’m always starting something fresh, so I have a super busy schedule lined up for the coming months.

Is there a hobby or skill you’d like to master?

If I had the time, I’d go back to my hobby of skateboarding, which I used to do about 10 years ago. That was a great time.

If you weren`t a DJ, what would you be doing?

Working with disabled people. I did that for 9 months in Germany. You have to choose between something social or going into army. I worked in villages with disabled people. I fell in love with this job, so I would do something social.

Advice for someone who wants to follow in your footsteps?

Find something of your own, don’t copy someone else. There’s already a Hardwell, an Armin, a Diplo. Everyone makes the same sh*t that made them famous. Take risks, do whatever you want, make it unique. It’s hard to do, since there’s so much out there, but that’s the most important thing. Keep focusing on producing music, and not on playing a lot. One song can change your whole life.

A Sit Down With DJ Olivier Giacomotto

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Olivier Giacomotto is a French producer, born and raised in the South West of the country, and now living in Paris. He bought his first studio kit at 18 years of age and has since branched out into several areas of music production. He has become something of an online techno star and in the last decade, has constantly been at the top of the Beatport charts with his own brands of techno, house, electro and tech-house. He has worked with artists like John Acquaviva, Umek, and Popof, and had releases on loads of labels including Suara, Get Physical, Noir Music, Definitive Recordings, Toolroom Records, and Trapez. More recently, he has moved from his own releases to producing music for video games and film soundtracks.

His unwavering determination to push the boundaries of him. Between the hits, Olivier composed several songs for the mainstream artists and publishers of the Rockstar Games. Midnight Club Los Angeles. Terry Lynn and Tom Frager. Olivier also produced for pop and reggae. One of his productions for Terry Lynn titled “Stone” was hit with “Date Night” with Steve Carell, Tina Fey, and Mark Wahlberg, and “Give Me That Love”, coproduced with Tom Frager on the major global music company Universal, have been charted during 2 weeks in the French. Always a step ahead, Olivier has recently revealed his whole ability to create an entire movie soundtrack for the US film The Red Man.

 

“Hard work is essential and working harder than all the others is the key to success. So no PlayStation, no sofa, only studio and creativity.”

 

When did you start writing/producing music – and what or who were your early passions and influences?

I’ve always loved music. I started with piano when I was 8, then guitar when I was 14, then I bought my first synthesizer when I was 18. Then I started to produce electronic music with my first PC in 1999. Back in those days I simply wanted to record and sequence what I had in mind, which was a wide range of non-electronic and electronic music. My main influences at that time were bands from the 70’s, 80’s, and 90’s like Pink Floyd, Depeche Mode, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Steel Pulse, Funkadelic, Maceo Parker and Kesiah Jones, but also Portishead, Dead Can Dance, Freak Power, Tricky, Howie B and many more.

How much of an impact did Paris have you as an artist at the start of your career?

​I​’m basically from Bordeaux and have only lived in Paris for 3 years now, but life here is boiling, always moving artistically, so I​’m proud being part of this.

How did you come about making music for video games and movies?

I didn’t write for video games, the company Rockstar Games was looking for new music for a new game they were developing, so they contacted Definitive Recordings and we licensed a few tracks.

What were your main compositional- and production-challenges in the beginning and how have they changed over time?

The first goal is to get enough quality to be signed, technically and creatively. The challenge is the same over time, only the quality and creativity level change. Step by step I acquired more knowledge to be able to increase my skills and techniques, this way the ideas in my mind are translated with more accuracy on my hard drive.

You can play various styles of progressive music including techno, house, electro, tech-house and deep house. What is your favourite style of music to play and why?

I played different styles at different times of my career, starting with techno, then electro, and then tech-house. But a style is part of an evolution, so right now I like to produce and play sounds that are released under the tech-house genre on Beatport. I like to say that I play for the girls, so that is the right combination of groove, funk, sexiness, sometimes deeper, sometimes darker, sometimes dirtier, sometimes more melodic, depends on the crowd and the venue.

How often do you produce, and can you tell us a bit about your studio set up? 

Well, I spend less time in the studio nowadays, it depends on my touring schedule, but it’s a minimum of 30 hours per week, it can go up to 50 hours a week, it depends on my touring schedule, and my family commitment. with more than 10 years of experience i work quite fast, i know how to translate my ideas into music way faster than before. In the studio I like to keep things simple, a laptop, a soundcard, a pair of good monitors, and a small room with a great acoustic treatment. everything i produce is made by plug-ins, even the mastering, there is no hardware involved at all. that let me the possibility to work in a hotel room, in a plane, in a train, etc.

You were nominated as best electro producer for the Beatport Music Awards 2008, which also tell us you have been in the scene for quite some time. Can you tell us a little about the nomination and your work?

I had my first record released in 2004, after all this time I can tell that nominations, awards, TOP10s, are the things that make you feel good, but are also the things I don’t think of when I produce. Recognition is not and will never be a motivation, I always keep in mind that I make music, and not marketing.

You compose across a lot of genres – what inspires each?

Inspiration depends on my mood. I can have a concept idea in the bath, driving my car or after a gig. It can be a lead synth first, or just a beat arrangement, a vocal, there is no rule. Then a song can be made in a day or in a month, or in three months – it’s a matter of satisfaction. Sometimes, ideas come in two hours – sometimes, it’s like a childbirth, it can be painful and long!

So tell us a little about your studio – it seems small but perfectly formed.

I’ve been trained on all kinds of high-end gear, but my studio is just a MacBook Pro with Logic Pro installed, an RME Fireface 800 soundcard, a pair of Event Opals, a small MIDI keyboard, and a SubPac. I only use plug-ins, like Native Instruments, Waves, Sonnox, Arturia, Soundtoys, and so on. As I said, I keep things simple. I travel a lot, so when ideas come, I need to have at least my laptop and my plug-ins to write them, then I make them perfect in the studio. Acoustic treatment of the room is also as important as the monitors.

What’s your vision on being a musician, besides making people dance? 

I’m first of all a musician, and I’m not a proper deejay… while producing my first tracks , I was thinking about what could be the best way to play my music? A liveset with machines or DeeJaying? Visually speaking, DeeJaying looks like more active than a Live Act… and when I discovered Final Scratch in 2001, I directly decided to buy it, being able to play at night, on vinyl’s, the track that you made in the morning seduced me.

A Sit Down With DJ D. Ramirez

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The D Ramirez name has been synonymous with cutting edge, forward thinking sound since the release of ‘that’ genre defining remix of Bodyrox’s ‘Yeah Yeah’ Top 40 #1 in the mid-noughties, but it’s the rich tapestry of production that followed that continues to make tidal waves across the industry. From Space Ibiza, Womb in Tokyo to Avalon in LA; or smashing sets at iconic festivals Glastonbury, Secret Garden Party, Global Gathering and Australia Day in Sydney; D Ramirez is a definitive crowd puller across the globe.

As well as commercial success with high chart positioning hits and even an appearance on the famous BBC television music show, Top Of The Pops, D. Ramirez has also received a number of illustrious industry awards throughout his career as a producer, from places DJ Magazine (Best Producer and Best Remix 2007), iDJ (Player of the Year) and even an Ivor Novello nomination for his now classic remix of Bodyrox ‘Yeah Yeah’. With his remixes of Roger Sanchez – Lost (D.Ramirez Lost In Rave Remix), which was named as Pete Tong’s Essential new tune, Plump DJ’s – Electric Disco (D.Ramirez Mix), also an Essential New Tune along with Max Linen – The Soulshaker (D.Ramirez Mix), D. Ramirez had his industry peers tipping their hats to him.

 

 “Being just a DJ isn’t enough these days – you need to bring something new to the table and impress people with a different skill set. “

 

Tell us about your musical background.

My real name is Dean Marriot. We might as well get the real name out of the way first. I’ve been producing music for the last 30 years. Making music was always a hobby for me, and I started when I was about 10 years old. Eventually I had some recognition for a track when I was producing with another guy under the name The Lisa Marie Experience. The track, ‘Keep on Jumping’ was what we became most famous for. That was in 1996 and went to number 5 in the UK charts. Later on in the 90s after doing hundreds of remixes and tracks I decided I wanted to make more techno-influenced House music and this is where the D.Ramirez moniker came from. I wanted to start again without any connotations as the Lisa Marie Experience was quite a commercial project, really. I wanted to do something dark, underground and dirty, and I didn’t want anyone to know it was me. I wanted people to think it was a Spanish dude, you know! Though I couldn’t look anything less like one actually. So, I’ve been doing the D.Ramirez project now since about 1999 and it’s going strong.

Talk us through your typical workflow from idea development to conception.

I always start by finding the right hook – whether it be a sample or a riff and i build it from there. I used to start with drums and percussion and add the hooks in later but now i get the hook first. Basically if i can have something sounding great with just a kick drum alone, i know i’m onto a winner. I’ll then start by throwing some loops (that i’ve collected over the years) around the hook in Ableton. Once i’m satisfied with the way things are sounding i’ll bounce everything out from Ableton and export into Logic Pro. I prefer to arrange in Logic as it’s just what i’m used to. Here i start to sketch out the track. This method is very much in keeping with the ‘left brain/ Right brain’ theory where i’ll play around with ideas first and then i’ll go into arrange mode later – it splits the 2 processes up.

You have been a firm fixture on the house and techno scene for many years, what do you feel is the secret to your continued success as a DJ and Producer? 

I think my secret is sheer tenacity-I’m a hard worker and I absolutely adore what I do. I love being in the studio, it’s all I need in life and making music is my number one pleasure. I’ll continue to keep doing this while ever I possibly can.

What kind of sound and what musical trend has inspired you most?

I have to say I was inspired the most as a child when the New Romantic scene broke in the early eighties. Bands like The Human League, Cabaret Voltaire, ABC, Depeche Mode, and Heaven 17 were my favourites. I even had the infamous asymmetric hair cut that Phil Oakey from the Human League had!

So, your music style has transitioned from upbeat, Electro House to underground Techno. Where do you feel your music is at now?

Well, I’ve had big moments in my career from the time of The Lisa Marie Experience. Ironically, I began making more underground music afterwards because I didn’t like the success and commercial nature that led to the expectancy of playing only a certain style of music. But then in 2006 the same thing happened: I released an experimental wonky-electro track that happened to go to number 1 in the charts. It was amazing but it kind of went against everything I wanted to do, because then everybody was looking at what I was doing, booking me for big concerts and festivals—which was brilliant—but with that came the expectation that I must play commercial music.  After that I decided I didn’t want to make that kind of music anymore, especially as a lot of other artists copied that sound I had started. So, I’d be hearing stuff and think, “Hang on a minute, that sounds familiar!” It wasn’t just that the style was copied, it got to the point where that genre got watered down and was being overdone. So I decided to start making minimal Techno which I think was a total shock to my fans, but I carved a little niche out doing that. Now I’m making more House-oriented music; Tech-House, and I’m signed to Toolroom who are purveyors of that sound. 

What part of the production process do you find the most challenging?

I currently struggle with getting my mix downs sounding fat enough. I’ve got to the point now where i don’t even attempt the mix anymore – i just pass it over to a mix engineer…

How do you think the technology affects the music producers release?

The kids now have the ability to make fully produced tracks entirely on a laptop from start to finish. You can produce and master a track using the best, professional plug-in’s on the market so it’s an open playing field out there at the moment technology wise. Although, just because there is all this technology available doesn’t necessarily mean that the track produced will be any good.

Recently, you have changed your musical direction and have been greatly influenced by Deep House and Techno, would you agree?

I have always loved house, deep house and the more underground techno sound. So I was really happy when I started to hear this music trickling back through the underground again; especially the old school sound that I grew up with.

Not only a label owner, producer and DJ, you are also a regular contributor to the academic side of things through your work with Toolroom Academy, SubBass DJ Academy and various online tutorials. What made you decide to give back?  Any further plans in this area? 

Teaching is something I really like, mainly because I get to talk about all the things that most people generally don’t want to listen to. I’m really passionate about music production and all the technology that goes with it, i love to learn new techniques and i love being able to share those techniques with others. I’ve recently become one of the main advisors for the Toolroom Academy and i’ve just completed a 6 hour long, Tech House Masterclass for Fader pro which is out now which i’m already getting loads of props for. Teaching is something a see a lot in my future as i’ll always want to give back.

What about hardware in studio and live?

I used to play with vinyl and then I got heavily into the laptop generation and started off with Serato Scratch and Traktor which I was using with the S4. But it was pretty big so I’ve gone back to using CDJs and USB sticks when DJing. Of course I use all my hardware to produce the tracks first and then play it live the easy way when I get to the gig. I’ve been collecting stuff for my studio for the last 25 years. I’ve got my SH1, Prophets, Jupiters and lots of stuff! I started getting into nice preamps. For example, I’ve got a Universal Audio 610 preamps, Culture Vulture stuff, and the Thermionic Culture Fat Bustard Summing Valve Mixer. So I’ve got all of this hardware mainly under dust sheets because I don’t get a chance to be in the studio much now. 

A Sit Down With DJ Getter

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Producer and DJ, Getter has established himself as one of the best rising acts in American-made bass music. He’s released a number of styles from dubstep to trap and drum & bass on Rottun, Firepower Records, and more recently OWSLA with the excellent “Head Splitter” single and a remix of Carmada’s “Maybe”.

You have years of experience as a producer and DJ. How did your career start?
Honestly it all just started for my sheer love for creating music. Before i produced or started DJing, I played drums and guitar for various metal bands with my friends. Just for fun. I later discovered I could make anything I wanted by myself on a laptop and immediately focused my energy on producing.

What elements do you think go into a good DJ set?

I think when the DJ can work with the crowd and take them through a journey. I was a fan first, so I have a good idea of what people want at shows. If I have ten unreleased songs and mash them up with other songs and surprise the crowd, they go crazy. You can kind of tell how the show is going by how the crowd is reacting, so when they are mellow, you gotta bring ‘em back.

How do you feel about genres?

I feel like genres are necessary to classify what you like, same with certain sub genres. I’m just not a fan of sub genres that can not be put on anything.

You’ve collaborated with the likes of Skrillex, Datsik & Borgore. Can we anticipate any big collaborations in the near future?

I have a whole new huge EP coming out later this year with a tour and a bunch of shit. I’m focusing a lot on hip-hop and vocalists. I could collab with Tiesto, I could collab with all these big ass EDM artists… but at the end of the day I like hip-hop and I like female vocalists. I’ve got $uicideboy$ on one song for the EP I’m working on. Kodak Blackmaybe. I’m really trying to collaborate with vocalists and rappers rather than EDM people. Not that I don’t like it, it’s just where I’m going.

 

“Without any idea I have or a song, they’re automatically on board ‘cause they believe in me and my vision”.

Can you tell us about the making of “Head Splitter”? 

I made it pretty quickly with no intention of release, and sent a rough version of it around to some artists. Next thing I knew, I got hit up to have it signed to OWSLA! I immediately went in and perfected all of it.

If you could choose one artist to work with, Who would it be and why? 
Definitely Eminem. Like old school Slim Shady shit. He’s my favorite rapper of all time and to have him on a track would be insane.

 Why did you decide to start Shred Collective?

I decided to start it because like, I came up the same way all of my friends came up right now where like you need to get handouts from people. Well, not handouts but help from people who are more popular than you. So I got to the point where I was like, I know enough people who are putting out music that I’m really close with, but they always go with labels and get f*’ed. They don’t get paid, or it takes forever for them to release something. So I’m just like dude, you will keep 100% of the money. I just spend the money I have and the money from merch sales and anything I do with Shred on the actual artists. 

How is the dubstep scene different than what it was five years ago?

There were so many people complaining about shit back in the day. Now I feel like it’s gotten to the point where everybody’s finally stopped arguing. People just listen to the music. Everybody’s doing everything now, it’s a lot more diversified. But at the same time its changed for the worst. A lot of times, in my experience, I’ll put out one type of music and get a bunch of fans in that genre or market, but then switch and try something else and then those people, previously calling themselves my number one fans, are cussing me out. That’s why I always blow up the topic online, I think it’s fucking annoying that people can’t make up their minds about what they like.

 Is there a right way and a wrong way to go about constructing your own tunes?

I really don’t like it when people ridicule others for using samples. Most of the earliest beats were 100% samples. I use lots of different samples but only for drums and effects. It’s dope to find a good snare sample with a nice transient and then make a snare out of that; it saves time and a lot of the time can sound better. I don’t understand using samples for the main synth, though. It takes out the originality.

Who can you attribute your success to? 

My number one mentor, the dude that got me to this point was Borgore because he’s been a big fan of my music and he’s super selfless. He cares about everyone else and he wants his friends to come up. I was hanging out with him a while ago and he introduced me to this guy Stephen that I used to know from back in the day, and then he started managing me. Shit just took off. He’s definitely one of the biggest reasons why everything is happening. He’s my biggest mentor and my best friend. Besides that, Flume is my biggest inspiration just because he does what he wants and he makes it fucking work.

Best advice for upcoming producers?

I feel like they gotta put their dicks away and stop waving them in front of everyone’s business. You just gotta let the music speak for itself. If you make good shit people will find it. Perfect example is Rickyxsan with his “Gettin’ That” record. He didn’t send it to anyone, people just heard it and then Skrillex and Diplo were playing it. People just need to stop sending so many emails and giving out USB’s and stuff.

A Sit Down With DJ Michel Woods

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From an early age, Woods has prided himself on standing apart from the crowd. He is the son of a music teacher, the U.K.-born Woods was classically trained in a variety of instruments ranging from piano to percussion, and as a youth he even performed briefly with the London Symphony Orchestra. The experience this musicality has brought now sets his productions apart and gives him an edge on contemporaries.

Michael Woods has sailed the seas of Dance music for many years, working ceaselessly to the top of the pile, where he unquestionably deserves his seat. His reputation as an essential booking for huge scale music gatherings across the planet is obvious to see by his continuous schedule of international bookings. It’s been twelve years since Michael’s legendary remix of Café Del Mar exploded onto the world stage and unlike many trailblazers of years gone by, Michael’s ability to evolve his productions and DJ sets alike have ensured that he remains a figurehead in the international House music league.

 

”The one thing I strive to do more than anything else when working on music is try to make a good club record”.

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How did you first make the transition into the trance world? Why was that the style of music that ended up taking over you life?
Trance was the first style of music I produced, but my style has changed a lot since the days of ‘Warrior’ and ‘Into the Dawn’ and carries a much more progressive/techno feel to it now. I’d say there are still elements of my sound from back then in the music I create now, but times change and with it my style changed; music progresses and artists have to progress with it. Trance will always be a big part of my life and has helped to shape me into the artist I am today. I wouldn’t consider myself a trance artist now.

What first got you into producing electronic music?

It kind of happened by accident, it wasn’t something I was actively looking to get in to, but around 16 years ago my sister, Marcella Woods, who is a vocalist in her own right, was dating a DJ/Producer by the name of Matt Darey. He took it upon himself to show me around his studio, and one day, while he was out of the studio I decided to mess around with some melodies and chords using his equipment – little did I know Matt had overheard what I was making and ran in to the studio asking me to play it again. We ended up making a record out of this music, signing it to Inferno Music and it went top 40 in the UK national charts – and I’ve been doing it ever since.

There has been always an antagonism between French and English, throughout the history. Could you please tell us what is your vision about the French electronic music scene?

Its hard for me to answer this question as to this day I have never been to a nightclub in France. Although France has spawned some amazing producers, for examples Justice.

What inspired you to make such an awesome song like Platinum Chains?

Michael Woods, laughs; and says “I remember writing it on the plane actually, I write a lot stuff when I’m on the plane I just came up with that cord thing that da-da-dee-da and I tried on the piano and it sounded completely different and just took it into the studio and it just worked and I released it to Calvin Harris and he loved it too and it was on his label Fly High and he was playing it at every single set and it blew up in that way too.”

 How do you deal with traveling the world, producing music and also being the founder of Diffused? What is your balance like on a day to day?

Drinking a lot of Patron! [Laughs]. You know, that is probably the most difficult thing to do, is trying to balance everything. There are only 24 hours a day, and so much you can do. Lucky, I have got a really cool management company like Three Six Zero who looks after Deadmau5, Calvin Harris etc. Within that company they look after my label. I have a management team that looks after the label and works with me so I do have got a good team around me that helps me out. Basically, all I have to do is make sure I am producing good records but outside of that I have people that help me out.

What technological change would fundamentally change the concept of DJ and/or clubbing?

I think that technology has completely changed the way clubs and clubbers have evolved since the explosion of acid house. Before, it was only records, then CDs and computers, now DJs are playing from their Ipads. Track titles are going straight onto twitter as they get played and sets are being streamed across the globe. Every year something new comes around that will have an impact on the clubbing scene, even mobiles have helped with clubbers asking DJs to play records, so who knows what’s around the corner next.

Where is your number one holiday destination?

If it’s a total holiday with nothing but chilling out I’d have to go back to the Maldives.

Do you have a favorite venue you’ve played?

Its really hard to answer this question as I’ve played at so many amazing venues all around the world, but I always love playing at Amnesia in Ibiza, Ministry of Sound in London and Cream in Liverpool, UK.

What advice could you give to aspiring musicians who want to contribute to the EDM scene?

My best advice for up and coming producers/DJ’s is to be really passionate about what you do, put in the time and never give up. I remember when I first started to make music professionally, sometimes I would spend up to 48+ hours at a time in that studio/garage, sometimes just listening to the same 4 bars over and over, trying to perfect it and get it just right. It was a lot of hard work and I made a lot of sacrifices but I’m reaping the rewards now, and I believe any aspiring producer/DJ can do the same if he/she puts in the hard work.